This blog comes from Nash carp star Julian Cundiff, one of the most popular and experienced men on the scene, sharing his advice to land multiple hits.

LIKE me I bet many of you have limited time to go carp fishing and when you do it’s important to make sure you maximise any opportunities.

For me one of the aspects of my fishing that I have always concentrated on has been trying to turn one bite into two, three or more.

Even in my old coarse fishing days for tench and bream my approach was not to catch one but to catch a keepnet full.

When I moved into carp fishing in the early eighties I took that with me and found that although I may not have been able to fish as often as many other anglers when I was on fish I could often end up with multiple catches so making the time away from the water more bearable.

So let’s look at a dozen top tips that will turn anyone into a carp bagging machine…..

Pick the right water

The only way to sharpen your skills is by actually having multiple hits and if you are not on the right water you won’t get that opportunity enough.

All waters can throw up red letter days but the more prolific and well stocked the water the better.

Venues like Brasenose on the Linear complex, Manor Farm, Drayton, Thorpe Lea and Chestnut are ideal to practice and fine tune those skills or even any well stocked local commercial fisheries.

So much to go for but some swims will be better than others for a multiple catch

So much to go for but some swims will be better than others for a multiple catch

Be prepared

I always go hoping for a multiple hit and have my tackle selected accordingly.

Plenty of pre tied rigs, two landing nets, spare bait in the car, the ability to do my own self takes, spare leads and so on.

If the water is one where I barrow my gear to and from the swim I’d honestly rather take too much gear than be short of something that could make a difference. It may well be trendy to take the minimum of gear but does that help or hinder you?

Being organised – essential when there might be a lot of action

Being organised – essential when there might be a lot of action

Get organized

Absolutely essential if you are on a roll and want to keep catching regularly on a session.

Swims that look like a tip when an angler is in them are not conducive to making the most of your time. It’s not speed fishing or a match so before you wet a line make sure you are organised.

Everything where it needs to be? Rigs and bags ready to go with spares close by? Self timer ready? Nets in position? All the gear to hand? Game on!!

End swims or one rod spots are not the choice for bagging

End swims or one rod spots are not the choice for bagging

Don’t get hemmed in

Although the expression ‘ they are where they are’ is very true the tighter the swim the more likely you are to move the fish away when you start catching.

Corner pegs and little bays may produce the odd one but are not the best place to look to bag up from. So often you’ll catch one carp quickly but then be sat twiddling your thumbs. Space is important if you are aiming to interest dozens of carp to feed at a time.

Write it down

I always draw a swim plan when I set up and cast out just to ensure that if I find a hotspot I can keep hitting the sweet spot day and night if need be.Lines are marked and casting markers are drawn in.

Memories are fallible but black and white on paper doesn’t lie. If I come back to a swim six weeks on I will still have a record of where produced the fish.

Get that first bite

Although it’s so tempting to go for broke if you are on fish it’s always best to get one in the net before you start firing out lots of free offerings.

It’s not a race take your time, don’t make rash decisions and think like a carp (catch loads and you will smell like one…).

Spread them out

Unless I know that all the carp are grouped in one area I tend to spread my rods a bit to see if I can find their preferred spots during my session.

Let them tell you where they are rather than fishing where you’d want them to be.

Often it is one rod that is doing the most fish, but moving another one to a different spot can give you two productive rods.

No worries about the bait – Key with added soak and stick mix

No worries about the bait – Key with added soak and stick mix

Be busy

No matter how short or long my session is I fish like an impatient angler.

I constantly watch the water, try new hookbaits, vary my casts, top up the swim and so on until I find a recipe that brings a take.

Sitting back and hoping it happens is not a good way to make it happen.

Milk it

When you do find the fish then you need to take full advantage. Having sight lines and marking your line with tape means you will be able to hit that spot time and time again.

Be prepared to put your eggs in one basket if it’s clear that the carp are favouring one spot.

When a carp is in the net be prepared to leave it in the net and get a fresh bait on the spot. Then do your pictures.

These windows of opportunities need capitalising on. You might quickly have two in the net(s)!

Local knowledge

Unless you know the water like the back of your hand be prepared to utilise local knowledge.

Be it swim choice, bait choice, tactics or anything it’s a great starting point that you can kick off from and then fine tune it for your approach.

Places like Brasenose, Drayton and the like get fished regularly and if one method is killing it then get on it rather than thinking you know better!

They count on top

Believe me the best way to have multiple hits is surface fishing by a long way.

So few anglers floater fish that it’s a massive edge and when you get them feeding on top they can be daft if I’m being honest.

I have had some of my biggest hits on Riser and Slicker pellets on the top so get practising that surface angling and you will soon start racking up the numbers.

Part of a multiple hit when even my granddaughter got in on the scene

Part of a multiple hit when even my granddaughter got in on the scene

Be clinical

The most efficient match, coarse and carp anglers leave nothing to chance and give it 100%.

Sure all anglers have red letter days from time to time – but those that are constantly catching numbers of fish are on top of their game and leave nothing to chance.

Prepping the gear in advance, being driven to succeed and creating and seizing opportunities is what they do well…..but  so can you!

Good Luck and Happy Bagging,

Julian

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